home | faq | registered students log-in | join our mailing list | e-mail us | to order

Clinical Supervision and Professional Development of the Substance Abuse Counselor

A continuing education course for 7 ces

consisting of reading and taking a post-test on:

Clinical Supervision and Professional Development of the Substance Abuse Counselor


APA, BRN, CA BBS, FL, NAADAC, NBCC, TX SBEPC, TXBSWE


Fulfills CA BBS & BOP mandatory substance abuse training and mandated prelicensure requirement

 

How This TIP Is Organized
This TIP is divided into three parts:
•Clinical Supervision and Professional Development of the Substance Abuse Counselor, Part 1.
•Clinical Supervision and Professional Development of the Substance Abuse Counselor: An Implementation Guide for Administrators, Part 2.
•Clinical Supervision and Professional Development of the Substance Abuse Counselor: A Review of the Literature, Part 3.
Parts 1 and 2 are presented in this publication; Part 3 is available only online at http://www.kap.samhsa.gov.
Part 1 of the TIP is for clinical supervisors and consists of two chapters. Chapter 1 presents basic information about clinical supervision in the substance abuse treatment field. It covers:
•Central principles of clinical supervision and guidelines for new supervisors, including the functions of a clinical supervisor.
•The developmental levels of counselors and clinical supervisors.
•Information on cultural competence, ethical and legal issues such as direct and vicarious liability, dual relationships and boundary issues, informed consent, confidentiality, and supervisor ethics.
•Information about monitoring clinical performance of counselors, the various methods commonly used for observing counselors, the methods and techniques of supervision and administrative supervision, and practical issues such as balancing one’s clinical and administrative duties, finding the time to do clinical supervision, documentation, and structuring clinical supervision sessions.
Chapter 2 presents the “how to” of clinical supervision. Chapter 2 contains:
•Representative vignettes of clinical supervision scenarios.
•Master supervisor notes and comments that help you understand the thinking behind the supervisor’s approach in each vignette.
•“How-to” descriptions of specific techniques.
It is strongly recommended that you read chapter 1 before reading chapter 2.

Part 2 is an implementation guide for program administrators and consists of two chapters. Chapter 1 lays out the rationale for the approach taken in chapter 2 and will help administrators understand the benefits and rationale behind providing clinical supervision for their program’s substance abuse counselors. Chapter 2 provides tools for making the tasks associated with implementing a clinical supervision system easier.
The following topics are addressed in Part 2:
•How to develop a model for clinical supervision and implement a clinical supervision program.
•Key issues for administrators to consider, including assessing organizational structure and readiness.
•Legal and ethical issues to consider.
•Cultural competence issues.
•Providing professional development for clinical supervisors.

Part 3 of this TIP is a literature review on the topic of clinical supervision and is available for use by clinical supervisors, interested counselors, and administrators. Part 3 consists of three sections: an analysis of the available literature, an annotated bibliography of the literature most central to the topic, and a bibliography of other available literature. It includes literature that addresses both clinical and administrative concerns. To facilitate ongoing updates (which will be performed every 6 months for up to 5 years from first publication), the literature review will be available only online at http://www.kap.samhsa.gov.



is approved by the:

American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists - www.psychceu.com maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
Board of Registered Nursing (#13620)
California Board of Behavioral Science accepts our CE Provider Approvals through APA, NASW, and NBCC. Course meets the qualifications for hours of continuing education credit for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science
Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage and Family Therapy, Mental Health Counseling (BAP 753 )
NAADAC - The Association for Addiction Professionals (#575)
National Board for Certified Counselors - www.psychceu.com has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6055. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. www.psychceu.com is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. (ACEP #6055)
Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors (#1761)
The Texas Board of Social Work Examiners (#6246)

www.psychceu.com
maintains responsibility for the program.

 

 

how it works

Due to the wonders of technology, the minute you submit your order over our secure line, it is encrypted, and processed safely and securely by Authorize.net, a secure web processor. Or, if you prefer, call us toll-free 888-777-3773.

You will immediately receive confirmation of your order, your password and how to access the course material. (Please do not block e-mails from classes@psychceu.com, orders@psychceu.com and info@psychceu.com)

If you ordered an online course, you can begin to take the course immediately.

You will receive instructions, via e-mail, on how to take your test online.

Contact us or call if you need technical support.

Your test will be graded online, so the moment you have passed, you may print out your certificate of completion.

That's it! You are done!

 


In this 7 unit course, Learning Objectives are:


•To discuss the central principles of clinical supervision and guidelines for new supervisors, including the functions of a clinical supervisor in the substance abuse treatment field.
•To assess the developmental levels of counselors and clinical supervisors.
•To describe cultural competence, ethical and legal issues such as direct and vicarious liability, dual relationships and boundary issues, informed consent, confidentiality, and supervisor ethics.
•Tot monitor clinical performance of counselors, the various methods commonly used for observing counselors, the methods and techniques of supervision and administrative supervision
To demonstrate
practical issues such as balancing one’s clinical and administrative duties, finding the time to do clinical supervision, documentation, and structuring clinical supervision sessions.

 

 

 

Clinical supervision is emerging as the crucible in which counselors acquire knowledge and skills for the substance abuse treatment profession, providing a bridge between the classroom and the clinic. Supervision is necessary in the substance abuse treatment field to improve client care, develop the professionalism of clinical personnel, and impart and maintain ethical standards in the field. In recent years, especially in the substance abuse field, clinical supervision has become the cornerstone of quality improvement and assurance.
Your role and skill set as a clinical supervisor are distinct from those of counselor and administrator. Quality clinical supervision is founded on a positive supervisor–supervisee relationship that promotes client welfare and the professional development of the supervisee. You are a teacher, coach, consultant, mentor, evaluator, and administrator; you provide support, encouragement, and education to staff while addressing an array of psychological, interpersonal, physical, and spiritual issues of clients. Ultimately, effective clinical supervision ensures that clients are competently served. Supervision ensures that counselors continue to increase their skills, which in turn increases treatment effectiveness, client retention, and staff satisfaction. The clinical supervisor also serves as liaison between administrative and clinical staff.
This TIP focuses primarily on the teaching, coaching, consulting, and mentoring functions of clinical supervisors. Supervision, like substance abuse counseling, is a profession in its own right, with its own theories, practices, and standards. The profession requires knowledgeable, competent, and skillful individuals who are appropriately credentialed both as counselors and supervisors.
Definitions
This document builds on and makes frequent reference to CSAT’s Technical Assistance Publication (TAP), Competencies for Substance Abuse Treatment
Clinical Supervision and Professional Development
Clinical Supervisors (TAP 21-A; CSAT, 2007). The clinical supervision competencies identify those responsibilities and activities that define the work of the clinical supervisor. This TIP provides guidelines and tools for the effective delivery of clinical supervision in substance abuse treatment settings.
The perspective of this TIP is informed by the following definitions of supervision:
•“Supervision is a disciplined, tutorial process wherein principles are transformed into practical skills, with four overlapping foci: administrative, evaluative, clinical, and supportive” (Powell & Brodsky, 2004, p. 11). “Supervision is an intervention provided by a senior member of a profession to a more junior member or members. . . . This relationship is evaluative, extends over time, and has the simultaneous purposes of enhancing the professional functioning of the more junior per-son(s); monitoring the quality of professional services offered to the clients that she, he, or they see; and serving as a gatekeeper of those who are to enter the particular profession” (Bernard & Goodyear, 2004, p. 8).
•Supervision is “a social influence process that occurs over time, in which the supervisor participates with supervisees to ensure quality of clinical care. Effective supervisors observe, mentor, coach, evaluate, inspire, and create an atmosphere that promotes self-motivation, learning, and professional development. They build teams, create cohesion, resolve conflict, and shape agency culture, while attending to ethical and diversity issues in all aspects of the process. Such supervision is key to both quality improvement and the successful implementation of consensus- and evidence-based practices” (CSAT, 2007, p. 3).
Rationale
For hundreds of years, many professions have relied on more senior colleagues to guide less experienced professionals in their crafts. This is a new development in the substance abuse field, as clinical supervision was only recently acknowledged as a discrete process with its own concepts and approaches.
As a supervisor to the client, counselor, and organization, the significance of your position is apparent in the following statements:
•Organizations have an obligation to ensure quality care and quality improvement of all personnel. The first aim of clinical supervision is to ensure quality services and to protect the welfare of clients.
•Supervision is the right of all employees and has a direct impact on workforce development and staff and client retention.
•You oversee the clinical functions of staff and have a legal and ethical responsibility to ensure quality care to clients, the professional development of counselors, and maintenance of program policies and procedures.
•Clinical supervision is how counselors in the field learn. In concert with classroom education, clinical skills are acquired through practice, observation, feedback, and implementation of the recommendations derived from clinical supervision.

 

Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs)

Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs) are developed by the Center for Substance Abuse
Treatment (CSAT), part of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
(SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Each TIP
involves the development of topic-specific best-practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment
of substance use and mental disorders. TIPs draw on the experience and knowledge of
clinical, research, and administrative experts of various forms of treatment and prevention. TIPs
are distributed to facilities and individuals across the country. Published TIPs can be accessed via
the Internet at http://www.kap.samhsa.gov.
Although each consensus-based TIP strives to include an evidence base for the practices it
recommends, SAMHSA recognizes that behavioral health is continually evolving, and research
frequently lags behind the innovations pioneered in the field. A major goal of each TIP is
to convey “front-line” information quickly but responsibly. If research supports a particular
approach, citations are provided.

APA Ethics

We do adhere to the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists. Our courses are carefully screened by the Planning Committee to adhere to APA standards. We also require authors who compose Internet courses specifically for us follow APA ethical standards.

Many of our courses contain case material, and may use the methods of qualitative research and analysis, in-depth interviews and ethnographic studies. The psychotherapeutic techniques depicted may include play therapy, sandplay therapy, dream analysis, drawing analysis, client and therapist self-report, etc. The materials presented may be considered non-traditional and may be controversial, and may not have widespread endorsement within the profession. www.psychceu.com maintains responsibility for the program and its content.

All material included in this course is either in the public domain, or used with express permission.

Cost of the 7 unit course is $88

Thank you!

 


To order


www.psychceu.com


e-mail us!

Frequently Asked Questions

888-777-3773

 

© 2017. www.psychceu.com. all rights reserved

 

 

 

privacy policy
to order

top